Posts Tagged ‘sales life’

I hate to tell you this, but chances are real good that you’ll never play for an NBA, NFL, nor any other professional team. Chances are even better that you’ll never sign a multi-year mega-million dollar contract either. When we hear the news, we day dream & talk at length about the massive contracts athletes sign in the off-season. In an effort to win a championship, teams lock up key players by inking them to multi-year, mega- million dollar contracts. Some of those deals you think are no-brainers…others you say, “What in the hell?,” to, but in either case, I guess hard work really does pay off, huh?

Or does it?

Because the following season after the player signed for instant wealth, they just don’t seem to run as hard, play through the pain as much, nor magically pull out a win the same way they did before they got caked up- which makes you ask the question, “What happened?” The response is always the same, “Oh, he got paid,” but that’s supposed to happen right? Aren’t you supposed to be paid for all of the hard work and sweat equity that you put in? Why doesn’t the athlete play like he used to? Why, if he’s making the most money he’s ever made-more then most of us could ever dream of, why is he so disruptive in the locker room & headlines?

What happened?

And there’s your answer…and your advantage. It happened for them & I hope it never “happened” for you. They realized their full potential and you have not. See, once these guys reach that max contract deal, it signifies that they’ve reached the top- all of it and then some- the problem is, when you think that you’ve reached the end, you cease working for new beginnings. Playing now switches from proving to protecting. Instead of playing & proving they’re worth the investment, they instead play not to get hurt & lose what they’ve contractually won.

So while yes, they should benefit from all of their hard, work, max deals should never equal max potential. See, if there’s no longer a bar to look up to, what would you reach for? Think about this, if I sat and wrote you a check for $1 million saying, “I think this is your full potential,” what would you do next? Would you look at it as a start or finish? Would you lay up & buy a bunch of shit or would you look at it instead as a down payment & parlay that monetary gain to make it work for you. Would you move the bar of potential up or would the bar just go away because now you’ve reached a certain status?

Contrary to athletes, no one is going to pay you in advance for what they think that you’re worth, you have to push the barriers of your potential every day, and as you do, you’ll earn not only monetarily, but also you’ll amass experience, wisdom, grit, & resilience along the way. And when you reach or even exceed your wildest expectations, because you’ve put in the sweat equity and kept moving the bar up, you’ll realize that you may have exceeded your expectations, but you have not exceeded your potential.

With each notch up, you get a newer, broader perspective. Your eyes are opened wider & what seems impossible to others, is i’mpossible to you. So you push even harder, higher, & broader in all directions- some days you don’t know if what you’re doing even matters…only to discover years later, it mattered and now here’s the meaning.

What was once the finish line now becomes the new starting line of so much more. Yes, have a destination, but I hope you never “arrive.” Play to your full potential today, but I hope you never reach it so that when you fight your ass off to reach your summit, you discover that you may have reached a summit, but not the summit because when you get to what you thought was the highest peak you could possibly climb, you look around & realize there are millions more higher mountains waiting to be climbed….by you.

Never stop climbing.

I’ll see you in the Sales Life!

⭐️⭐️Subscribe to my weekly podcast The Sales Life w/ Marsh Buice. You can find it on iTunes, Spotify, or Google Play

For every now, there was a then...

Once it was just Mick, Keith, Charlie, & Ronnie before they became The Rolling Stones. Don, Joe, & Timothy were just regular dudes before they became the legendary band called the Eagles. Andre & Antwan weren’t always Andre 3000 & Big Boi of OutKast. “Luda!” wasn’t shouted by the doctor as he slapped Chris Bridges on the ass in the delivery room.

When you look at people’s now, remember there was a thenmany, many then’s in order to become their now. Be patient & work your ass off in the months & years of then’s. Yes, it’ll be thankless @ times; it’ll seem as if it’s for naught often; periodically you’ll feel like a damn fool for grinding on your dream while everyone else seems to be getting ahead except you.

When your days are in the ditch, remind yourself that you’re investing in your then…your nows will come soon enough & the results will pay off.

For “then” just keep working for “now.”

I’ll see you in the Sales Life.

Subscribe to my weekly podcast The Sales Life w/ Marsh Buice. You can find it on iTunes, Spotify, or Google Play

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You’re gonna have your whoa-mentum days those days where no matter how hard you worked, the wheels wobbled and maybe even flew off and you skidded into the end of your day saying, “Whoa!”  Whoa-mentum days jack you up mentally and the next day you have the choice to either carry yesterday’s whoa-mentum forward, by thinking negatively and working less, or you can instead choose to treat whoa-mentum days for the blessings that they are.

I say whoa-mentum days (WMd’s for short) are a blessing because those are the rare occasions that you are alerted of momentum slippage. Use those days to determine what caused the whoa-mentum. Maybe you worked too fast with a customer; asked limited questions to see if the customer was “worth your time;” weren’t persistent enough in asking for the business; or you just dialed in the effort, giving a half-baked effort because you weren’t feeling the customer. If you can detect what specifically caused your whoa-mentum, then you can quickly make the course correction to get your month back on track.

The tricky part is that momentum is so sneaky and subtle that you don’t realize you’ve lost it until it’s too late because lost momentum usually takes weeks to reveal its full negative impact and it takes days-if not weeks to regain the rhythm back.

Take yesterday’s whoa’s and feed the mo-chine...the machine of momentum by applying the formula: Consistent action, applied strategically with persistence, equals Momentum.

I’ll see you next time on the Blacktop!

Subscribe to The Sales Life w/ Marsh Buice podcast where we make a point in minutes not hours. Check it out on iTunesSpotify, or your favorite podcast platform.

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After losing 70 lbs many people ask me how I lost the weight and although I was excited to tell them all of the thoughts and methods that went into my no pill, no surgery weight loss, I found that I would lose them in mere seconds. At first, they were eager to hear, but when I exploded into my passionate ordeal, their eyes would glaze over with information overload. So now when people ask me the “how’d you do it” question, I keep it simple by saying, “Just do one thing..”

I had a friend who was frustrated because she couldn’t seem to shake the baby weight off and everyone she asked gave her conflicting advice. One person says more cardio and less weight training while another says less cardio and more weights; one says to eat more fruit another person says eat bacon and cut out the carbs. She had no idea who to believe so she ended up doing what most of us do…nothing.

She ended up joining a gym, but ended up never going because her days were overloaded with taking the kids to & from school, dropping them to karate and dance, rushing home to cook, take baths, and do homework so by the end of the day she was too exhausted to even cry. The thoughts of what she should do made the situation even worse, “I know I should work out, but I’m just too tired and hate myself  for not going,” she said. Her frustration led her to smoke more, eat worse, and sink even deeper into misery.

All I could do is smile because we can all relate to her story.

My advice to her? “Just do one thing…”

The reason why resolutions don’t work is because we try to change too much all at once. We vow to not eat fried food and never look twice at Blue Bell ice cream again. We swear that we’re going to get up early and not stay up late…someday…just not today, because we’re too busy running on the hamster wheel of Life.

Studies show that if you try to change 3 or more things at once you’ll have a 5% chance of success; if you try to change 2 habits, you’ll increase your chances of success to 30%, but if you just try to change 1 habit, you’ll have an 85% success rate. If you’re trying to lose weight, pay down debt, or be more productive or knowledgeable, just do one thing to nudge yourself in the right direction.

In my friend’s case I asked her, “What is the one thing that you could put into your already hectic life right now that wouldn’t disrupt everything else?” She stared at me blankly unable to mentally find the overlaps in her time.  She told me that she didn’t like to wake up early; collapses in bed exhausted every night, and her lunches are crammed with having to run around town and pay bills. Her only constant was her three 15 minute smoke breaks every day. “Give me 1/2 of each one your breaks,” I told her, “The first 8 minutes are yours to do whatever you want to do-smoke, gossip, drink soda-do whatever, but the other 7 minutes I want you to walk around the outside of the building. On the next break do the same thing except go into the bathroom stall and knock out as many air squats as you can in 7 minutes. The last break go for another walk and bang out some push-ups in an obscure location or do lunges the full length of the hall way.” The truth is we all have spare moments, but the fallacy is that we think the moments are too insignificant to see any real, meaningful results…so we end up doing nothing, but beating our self-esteem to death.

Without changing anything in the course of a normal, chaotic day, she just found 21 minutes to change the course of her life.

Can you write a book, master a craft, or have a beach body in just 21 minutes? Not in “a” day, but you sure as hell can “per” day.

The problem is we want the results, but haven’t yet built in the consistency, so taking 7 minutes a few times during the day will do just that. These micro-wins cauterize the depression and negate the self-sabotage and as you win more, you’ll find that you’ll challenge yourself to more too. With a fresh perspective, you’ll find more windows of opportunities to increase your success capital. Early into my weight loss quest, instead of mindlessly scrolling through social media while waiting for my son’s practice to end, I jumped rope while he took snaps. At games, during half time, instead of running to the concession stand, I would sneak off to a secluded part of the parking lot and do a 15 minute body weight program from the Fitness Blender channel on YouTube instead. This is what James Clear calls habit graduating; putting 1 habit into your day, becoming a mf’ing boss at that tiny habit, and then graduating with a little more along the way. My 7 minutes, led to 15 minutes, which parlayed to 1 mile that ended up in a half marathon and along the way, I ate better, thought clearer, and produced more.

The slights got you to where you are today…and the slights will take you where you need to be in the future…but first start with just 1.

I’ll see you on the other side and can’t wait to hear about your results.

Subscribe to The Sales Life w/ Marsh Buice podcast where we make a point in minutes not hours. Check it out on iTunesSpotify, or your favorite podcast platform.

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Episode #287: “The University Of Adversity”

Listen to the 7 min episode right here

  • How did a guy named Augustine go from a drunk, contemplating suicide to selling over 50 million books in over 25 languages?
  • How do you deal with Adversity?
    • Adversity doesn’t care how good you’ve been; how loyal you are; nor how low you already are.
  • There’s no better school than Adversity
    • All of us enroll, but none of us graduate.
    • You can’t delegate adversity , you have to attend your own school of adversity.
  • “All of us are tested in the furnace of disaster, but not all of us will emerge, but I will emerge. Gold can remain in the fiery furnace for months and not lose a grain and I am more precious than gold.” 

  • You can’t hide nor outrun adversity, she’ll catch you eventually.
  • “The gem cannot be polished without friction and I cannot be polished without trials.”

What did this episode mean to you? Share your thoughts.

Subscribe to The Sales Life w/ Marsh Buice podcast on iTunes, Spotify, or your favorite podcast platform. Making a point in minutes, not hours.

weeds Subscribe and listen to this episode of  The Sales Life w/ Marsh Buice right here.

I ran into my old college football coach the other day and we reminisced like all old, has-been’s do about yesteryear…we scoff about how good the players today have it versus the little we had to work with back in the days. Teams today have the luxury of shoe and apparel contracts that we didn’t. We practiced with threadbare shirts-so thin that you could see right through the shirt when you held it up to the light; we taped up our cleats not because it was the fashionable thing to do, but because they would fall apart during a game if you didn’t; every Sunday the game jerseys were sewn back up-by the end of the season,  you had so much patchwork that it looked more like grandma’s quilt than a jersey. Our dorms had asbestos ceiling tiles and nutria rats as roommates-at night you could hear them scratching around and you’d lay in bed hoping they wouldn’t fall through the missing ceiling tiles.

Twenty-three years removed from playing, Coach opened up and told me that he would be on his hands and knees pulling weeds out of the flower bed in front to the field house so that it wouldn’t be an eyesore to visitors. There was no money in the budget for anything-literally. Coach had to dig into his own wallet and give the grounds crew gas money so that they could mow the knee-high grass; some days Coach would have to mow the fields himself before practice. Just before we were to report for the upcoming season, Coach ran around town scrapping up enough money to paint over the rust in the weight room & lay down some cheap outdoor carpet because he wanted it to look a little more aesthetically pleasing to us.

Seeing the disbelief on my face, Coach said,Sometimes, you just make it work, Marsh.” I had no idea the struggles he and his staff were facing. We had no clue what lack we were dealing with- and he kept us out of it because Coach knew we had a job to do and our only job was to make the grades and play ball…and that we did. I have 3 rings to show for it.

The people you lead don’t need to know all of your struggles. They don’t need to know what you don’t have, can’t do, and have no support of. They don’t need to know all of your struggles because they have struggles of their own and standing around  bitching about it won’t accomplish anything anyway.

Sometimes, you just make it work and collectively, as a team, you draw on whatever resources you have and fight to win. 

As weak as your struggles make you feel, there’s actually strength within them-not only for you, but for others as well. Struggling develops your sense of competence and confidence. When you’re pushed to the brink-where your only option is to figure it out…you do things that you had no clue you were capable of accomplishing. Every setback increases your resilience…every win forges your confidence and you become an example not only to others, but a higher-level example to yourself.

And when you scrape, stretch, and scrimp to just make it work, you and your team find a way to succeed…because all of you do what it takes to W.I.N. 

To do What Is Necessary.

Listen to this episode of  The Sales Life w/ Marsh Buice right here.

 

 

 

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Side note: I read Josh’s book a couple of years ago and one part of the book always stuck with me. It was the lesson that he learned early on while attending a kicking camp. His coach told him to always, “Kick the ball the same.” It’s an analogy that Josh has taken and helped make him a million dollar real estate broker and TV personality. (He has a show on Bravo called Million Dollar Listing) Basically he uses the analogy to set his opportunities up the same way because you never know, what seems like a small opportunity today, where may lead down the road. (He tells you more in the book of how a client looking for a rental turned into a couple of mega million dollar properties.)

Here’s what I learned from today’s podcast. 

  1. It seems small now. Many things you do today seem like they’re insignificant or don’t matter. You may be asking yourself, “Why in the hell am I doing this.” Lesson: It may not matter now, but will carry meaning later. Josh took a damn kicking analogy from his childhood and parlayed the concept to live damn well today.
    • What seemingly back-in-the-day bullshit lesson (think Karate Kid Wax on Wax off analogy) have you taken and used in your life today that you are so grateful for? 
  2. It ain’t the ball, it’s the kicker. How do you approach your opportunity…hell do you even see it as an opportunity or do you view it as another waste of time? Well if it looks like a waste of time, it will be a waste of time because that’s how you set up your “kick.” Your customers get what you’ve gotten. If you’re having a shitty month they get shitty service by you, but it you’re having a Land of Milk & Honey kind of month, boy you’re customers won’t find a better salesperson. Lesson: Every customer, every opportunity stands on it’s on. You may have to adjust your process, but you should never adjust you’re effort. And this shit is hard to do because in sales we sell from our soul. Just keep the analogy in your mind…don’t shrink just because you’re not having a good month, set the damn situation up as if it’s the best month ever and kick that shit. Whatever happens, happens, just don’t let it be because of your 1/2 ass effort.
  3. You’re not in control of the outcome….but you can heavily influence it. Riffing off #2 (& because I need a 3rd point), once your “ball” is in the air, you can’t waive or wish it to go a different direction. It’s going to go the way it goes. The question is, what do you do with the outcome…good or bad what happens from here? Do you learn from it? Do you blame others? Do you call yourself a slap-nut p.o.s? Lesson: Honestly assess what just happened and own that shit. It doesn’t matter the circumstances that surrounded the opportunity, it only matters how you approached it. Learn from it and set up your next kick and by the way, if it was a win, raise the bar and look for your next one-stop holding a victory parade for yourself.

Thought of the day: What tense are you? Managers tend to only have 1 tense; they manage only what is directly in front of them, but leaders have dual tenses; they manage both the present and future tenses. Yes they see today, but they also look toward the future. They do it not only with their business, but more importantly they do it with their people. They don’t just see people for who they are today, they see them for who they can become and set the bar accordingly.

Check out The Sales Life w/ Marsh Buice podcast.