Posts Tagged ‘dealerelite’

janitor

When my daughter MacKenzie says her prayers at night, I let her free flow-whoever and whatever she wants to pray for, I let her roll. One night as she was praying, she prayed for a name that I’d never heard before-his name was “Mr. Vic.” When I asked her who “Mr. Vic” was, she told me that he was the janitor at her school. “I’m praying for him, because he’s always nice to me,” she said. The other day Mack forgot her lunch, so I told her I would drop it off on my way to work. With only a few minutes to spare, I rushed into her school and placed her Lunchable on the table next to the lunchroom entrance alongside of a half dozen other kids who forgot their lunch too.  As I whirled around a man mopping the school’s floors, stopped swaying the mop from side to side and with a big, toothy grin, asked me how was I doing?  In a rush, I smiled back and told him I was doing fine and in turn, asked him how he was doing, but I didn’t have time nor the inclination to wait for his answer. As I waved goodbye to the ladies in the school’s front office it hit me, the man I had just spoken to in the hallway was Mr. Vic.

Turning around I walked back down the hallway and asked him, “Are you Mr. Vic?” he smiled and said that he was and as I shook his hand I said,  “Thank you for what you do, Mr. Vic.”  Stopping his mop, he pridefully looked around and said, “Oh, I’m just trying to keep it looking good around here.” “No,” I said, “Thank you for what you do while you’re here.”  I went on to tell him how my daughter prayed for him and that I appreciated how nice he was to her. “Sir, I’ve been here a long time, but I’m not here for the money-I’ve been offered opportunities to work at other places for way more money, but I don’t feel like that’s the position I’m supposed to be in. Maybe one day, but right now, I’m right where I’m supposed to be. My position is right here with these kids.”
Life is a blur and then we die. It becomes a blur because, we’re so focused on titles that we give no thought at all to our position in life. We’re so fixated on how the words printed below our name on our business card read; so hellbent on trying to schmooze with certain people, so adamant about rubbing elbows with a certain others, and are so seemingly obsessed with who we can step on, beat out, or crossover in our quest for a title, that we’ve lost sight of the most impactful part of our lives..our position.
If not today, one day you could find yourself wearing a title that you don’t care for-maybe you’re working for someone that you feel is inferior to your skills and expertise; perhaps you’re being asked to shoulder more responsibility with no more pay; or it’s conceivable that you find yourself standing in the ashes of a once promising career-for years you climbed the ladder of success-literally sacrificing everything, only to find yourself today back on the bottom rung having to start all over again.
Ground zero is where most people stall in life and ask, “Why?” Why was I passed over for this promotion? Why am I the one singled out to do more work while others stand around and get the credit? Why did injustice prevail and ruin my life? People who ask why park in life and become bitter; people who ask while move forward in life and become better.
The better question is to ask, “What do I do while I’m in this position?”
  • If you work for someone who you feel is inferior to your level of expertise and knowledge, your job is to make them look better. You have to understand this one position is not the end game in life unless you allow it to be. Use your vantage point to not only shore up their areas of weaknesses but also to gain a bird’s eye education into the pressures and decisions that they must make on a daily basis. If they’re poor at building relationships, you help build it for them; if they’re unorganized, you keep them on task; if they’re short sighted, you help them set the long-term vision. Stop competing for their title and begin completing their position. Not only will you earn her trust, but also you’ll build the morale of the  entire store. Remember, you’re teaching those who work under you how they should think and act. If you want it done to you, do it to others; if you want it done for you, do it for others.
  • If you keep getting volunteered for more work, shut up and do it. It’s been said that if you want something done, give it to a busy person. Don’t think like those who want to get the most for doing the least. Learning and teaching a new skill keeps you out of your comfort zone, raises your level of expertise, and makes you more valuable. Don’t wait for something catastrophic to occur to decide that you need to raise your game. Stay ready, don’t get ready.
  • If you find yourself back on the bottom rung in life…you’re not alone. We’ve all been there. I worked hard and lived fast until in 2008 I lost it all. I was financially, mentally, and spiritually bankrupt and had to start all over again. With my ego stripped, my position removed, and my hope lost I was scorched earth. But out of the ashes come new growth. It was at that time that I had to take responsibility for my life, put my feet back in the stirrups, and ride life’s horse again. I learned how to appreciate the good times and the bad; I realized that I could never be satisfied with what I already knew, and I had to lean on God to remind me that I still had more to give and much more to do. What you’re reading is my position..it is my testimony to let you know that you are not alone.
When you leave a room or leave this world what will be said about you? Obituaries are for titles-all the awards you amassed, all of the boards you sat on; all of the ribbon cutting ceremonies you attended will be printed on that piece of paper. But eulogies are for position. What will your eulogy be? What impact did you make for those you were around? Use your position to friend the porter who eats alone at lunch; use your position to encourage the accounting clerk who can barely pay rent and day care; use your position to develop the salesperson whose last resort is the car business.
Why’s not the question. While is. Use your position to go make an impact. They’re waiting on you…
Thank you, Mr. Vic.

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No words can describe the sensation of walking into a spider web- no matter if you’re running late to pick your child or just mindlessly walking down a hallway, the minute you feel the web of the spider’s silk cling to your face, you freak out. To an observer, it looks as though you’ve suddenly lost your mind. Seizing in terror, you drop everything and begin clawing at your face. After raking your fingers through your scalp and swatting your body, you end up looking like the lead singer of a big-haired 80’s rock band who slept in his car all night. In short, you look a hot mess.

When you walk through a spider web, what do you fear most, the spider or the web? If you’re anything like me, you fear the end result, the spider. In my mind’s eye, I can see a pissed off spider, in retaliation for my destroying its web work-of-art, scurrying down my shirt collar, biting my neck, poisoning my bloodstream, and killing me instantly-leaving behind my wife and 4 kids. Wow, in a matter of seconds, I go from minding my own business, to that of destruction and death. And it’s all a lie.

 Out of a population of over 316 million Americans, fewer than 7 people die from a spider bite each year. (That’s a .0000000221319% chance by the way). Actually, you’re 8x more likely to die from a bee sting than from a spider bite. What you feel is real, but what you fear is not.

Isn’t this what usually happens in life? One minute you’re strolling through life and suddenly you become entangled in one of life’s unseen webs. A turning economy destroys your credit and pushes you into bankruptcy; after 25 years of being married to, who you thought was your best friend, is ending in divorce; after literally giving everything to your career-missing countless dinner dates, birthday parties, recitals, and basketball games, your employer suddenly eliminates your position-leaving you to pick up the fragments of your once thriving career. Bullying, discrimination, errant choices –it doesn’t matter because life’s webs do not discriminate-we all walk through them.

But the webs in your life are temporary, not terminal. Yes, what you are going through sucks-often it feels as if there is no end in site, but the good times aren’t final nor are these bad times fatal. Every darkness ends in sunrise; there is healing on the other side of this hurt. You will get through this because…

…there is no spider in your web.

Although it’s been over 2 decades since I played my last down of high school football and to this day, I still know my fight song. Our fight song was what we stood for, fought for- why we played every Friday night. Now a little older, do you have a fight song? On the blacktop, you need a fight song- your fight song is ….

Posted: February 12, 2013 in Uncategorized
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William Ward wrote, “Study while others are sleeping; work while others are loafing; prepare while others are playing; and dream while others are wishing.” You don’t need to be more talented than others- you just need to be willing to outwork them. Those who leave last will finish first. Work hard now so you can play harder later.

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Have you ever noticed when you only have 7 days left in the month, everything seems to matter? As sands of the hourglass mark the passing of the remaining 168 hours, it is at that point you miraculously can account for every one of your Ups, Demos, Write-ups, Sales, and Deliveries. First here, last gone; fewer lunches; no more huddles-nothing matters more than your working feverishly to cover your draw. Mentally exhausted; not knowing whether to giggle or cry from exasperation, you live to see another month, but now face the daunting task of having to start it all over again in 8 short hours.

As the dry-erase boards are wiped clean and the dawn of optimism breaks through the horizon of rejection, your new month begins now. It wasn’t by accident you pulled out your month, it was your focus; instead of glaring at the remaining 7 days of your month, alternatively choose to focus on the 7 days beginning your new month.

The greatest debt owed on the blacktop is your draw and the faster you can pay it back, the more control you will have over your month. With the beginning of a new month, many of us vow to work Bell to Bell, working from sunup to sundown in order to maintain an edge, but that edge is short-lived because you are not in “sales shape” to maintain that kind of pace-it’s like going jogging for the first time by entering the Boston Marathon. No matter your intentions, you cannot keep with the grueling pace and quit within the first mile-markers of your month. With your pride battered and beaten, you being your biggest critic, you settle into what you know best, working the 2:00 offense in order to pull out another month.

You cannot maintain a sprinter’s pace the entire month, so instead focus intensely on the first 7 days because doing so, will chart the course of the rest of your month. In the first 3 days, you need to be “on the board” with your first sale and by the 7th day, you need to have your draw covered. After that, the month is all yours- you are debt free! When you are released of an obligation, you can afford to take risks-every Up is not a Do or Die situation determining the outcome of your month. When you are released of an obligation, you now can focus on being more creative with your presentations-allowing your true personality to shine through, becoming other’s centered in lieu of being ME-focused.

An impoverished month begins with an indebted mindset. Seven days owed, 18 left to live freely.

I’ll see you next time on the blacktop.

Hearing the words, “That guy’s been here before,” can crush the spirit of a sales consultant..or can it? Be wary of another sales consultant giving you “advise.”

A child learning how to walk makes the best goal setter. Without permission or opinion, he will crawl toward that of the interim and pull himself up. With steadied determination, in spite of his quivering legs, he will then push away and begin to walk toward his focus which is just out of reach. Only when he becomes distracted does he fall short of his goal. The art of the start is in the risk of the walk.