Posts Tagged ‘Carpeople’

In sales, we’ve always been taught to “mirror” our customers, but what do you do when your customer is rude?

alone on deck

Showing up today matters.
It matters that you show up on time for work.
It matters-even if it’s 2 words or 2 sentences- that you find something worth writing down today that will help shape you into becoming better than you  were before you captured it.
It matters how quick and how many customers you are willing to get in front of today.
It matters that you are brave enough to pick up the phone and risk hearing a customer reject you instead of hiding behind a text message.
It matters that you ask your customer optimistic building questions instead of pessimistic, narrowing ones.
It matters that your customers demo the vehicle.
It matters that you write your customers up.
It matters that you persistently press forward beyond the 1rst, third, and 4th No.
It matters that you turn your customers over to let a fresh face help you.
It matters that you follow through after the sale-you not only need your clients to make your month, you need them to make your career.
It matters that you remain walking with your customers during the frustrating moments-the moments when the warranty they paid $2500 for won’t cover the repair.
It matters that you follow up and stay in touch with your customers’ lives not their wallets.
It matters that you help others regardless of what’s in it for you.
It matters that you’re willing to be a student of your profession.
You showing up today matters because everything you do (or don’t do) is significant to the outcome of your day, month, year, career, and your life.
(Yes, your life.)
What you do matters, but the emphasis of those matters have the wrong meaning.
When a customer hangs up on you…
When a customer won’t get out of the car and give you a chance to help them…
When a customer gets annoyed because you can’t tell them a price or tell them what their trade is worth in the first 30 seconds of meeting them….
When a customer won’t demo…
When a customer refuses to come inside “for your business card”…
When a customer  jumps across the street and buys from your competitor because you didn’t turn them over…
When a customer goes off on you because you dropped the ball while their car was in service…
When a customer won’t return your phone calls…
When a customer gets cold feet after agreeing to buy…
Failing matters, but it doesn’t give a meaning to what you are worth.
The ill moments-the moments when you screwed up, blew up, got yelled at, or were left standing alone should be tied to matters of the day not meanings of your heart.  What you do has to matter-showing up today, facing the giants in your life, has to be worth it…if it’s not worth it, don’t show up. Pivot and find something worth showing up for. What you do today has got to be so significant- so important to you, that the implications of what you do is higher than the outcome that it may produce. 
 
The outcomes only define how well you did something- they don’t define who you are or what you’re worth.  
 
Rejection is a lesson in self-education not self-worth. Use the losses, defeats, setbacks, and almosts as education not excuses. While circumstances are the banality of most, you forge ahead, working and reworking today’s defeats into tomorrow’s victories.  Sure rejection hurts- we don’t like the sting of hearing NO and the stains that it internally leaves behind;  we don’t like the fact that we poured out two hours of our best efforts only to have our customer go down the road to save a few hundred bucks. Rejection hurts, but you must not let it kill you.
Rejection has matter not meaning- the significance of what you do and how you do it matters. How much you’re willing to give to that matter is what has meaning.
I’ll see you next time on the Blacktop.

lonely-old-man1

It’s painful….

  • It’s painful to have the last 4 customers in a row tell you NO.
  • It’s painful to have a deal slip right through your fingers-they agreed to everything only to have a family member show up and queer the deal.
  • It’s painful to believe a customer is “coming right back” only to find their right back was not at your dealership.
  • It’s painful to hear that a customer that you spent 2 hours with yesterday bought elsewhere today.
  • It’s painful to stay late putting a deal together-to miss seeing your children before they go to sleep only to have the deal roll back in the morning.
  • It’s painful to have a customer drive off on you because you couldn’t tell him your “rock bottom price.”
  • It’s painful to have a customer come back, but not want to work with you.
  • It’s painful to see other salespeople selling cars all around you.
  • It’s painful to have second guessed catching that Up that turned into a deal.
  • It’s painful to have a customer hang up in your face.
  • It’s painful to not be able to lure a customer inside with the the “come on in and I’ll get you my business card” close.
  • It’s painful to hear your manager scorn that you’re not demo’ing, writing up, nor convincing enough customers to buy-punctuated up with, “You’d better figure this out real quick” threat.
  • It’s painful to not be able to even sell your best friend.
  • It’s painful to show a customer a note twice as much as what they’re paying now.
  •  It’s painful to hear people tell you that you’ll never make it in this business.
  • It’s painful to wake up in the morning-feet throbbing, back sore, and forehead blistered from standing in the sun all day every day.
  • It’s painful to hear your mind screaming that you’re not cut out for this, that you’ve lost your touch, that you should go to lunch and never come back.
  • It’s painful to have to start at zero every single month!
It’s painful…
I know…
But it’s not experiencing the pain that counts…
It’s not just you, we’ve all experienced these pains.
But it’s what you do with these painful experiences that matter.
They matter because you can either let the pain define why you can’t do, won’t be, and shouldn’t have…
Or you can allow the pain to refine your talents, shape your character, and form your destiny.
Success is painful…
It’s supposed to be-if it weren’t you’d never think; if you didn’t think then you’d never fight; if you never fought, you’d never learn; if you never learned, you’d never grow.
Experiencing pain is temporary-that’s called failure….
Avoiding pain is permanent-that’s called regret. 
Most people get to the end of life recollecting not of their failures…
They reminisce over their regrets.
Don’t ever get to the end saying, “I should’ve…”
Face the pain, saying, “I did.”
I’d rather try and fail than succeed at not trying.
I’ll see you next time on the Blacktop.
MB

So your month isn’t starting off like you hoped, huh? I know, you started the month off vowing to go back to the basics, but now it seems as though you’re the only one not selling anything. 

Here’s my advice to you: Be mad, but don’t get mad
Be mad at your situation, but don’t get mad at your process. The worst thing you can do is get mad- when you get mad, you lose your composure- quickly becoming agitated and make a big deal out of the smallest things; you become self-oriented-having a me against the world, I gotta get mine, mentality; start blaming everything & everyone instead of taking responsibility for your own efforts, and become uncoachable- choosing to be deaf, dumb, & blind to making the necessary adjustments in your techniques. 
When you get mad, you take shortcuts- the problem with that is when you shortcut your process you lengthen your time of recovery.  
So Be Mad, but Get Consistent.  Keep your thinking, speech, body language, and effort focused on the results you’d like to see. 
Have a great week on the Blacktop! 

(Video) Be Dyslexic In Your Goal Setting: It was a German philosopher Frederick Nietzsche who said, “Many are stubborn in the pursuit of the path they have chosen, few in the pursuit of a goal.” The reason why you on accomplishing your goals is because you’re in flexible in your path, yet flexible when your goals. If you want to taste from the fruits of success, then you have to flip your inflexible/flexible mindset around. Let me explain more…

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“Many are stubborn in pursuit of the path they have chosen, few in pursuit of the goal.” Friedrich Nietzsche German Philosopher
How many times have you set a goal only to let loose of the idea the minute adversity hits you? As Nietzche relates, the reason why you don’t accomplish your goal is because you’re inflexible in your path yet flexible on your goal. For instance, let’s say your goal is to break out of your 8 car shell and sell 15 cars this month- a few days later you  find yourself backing back into your 8 car garage again. Like putting your hand on a hot stove, the reason why you’re stuck in your career is because you’re inflexible to your comfort zone-the minute you feel the discomfort,  pain, and setbacks, you immediately drop the notion of doubling your sales output and fall back into the warmth of familiarity.  
If you want the taste of success, then you must become dyslexic in the way that you eat it- flip your inflexible/flexible mindset around. Be tenacious and lock into your goal, yet remain adaptively flexible to the adversity that comes against you. Like everyone, you’ll have setbacks, rollbacks, turndowns, rejections, and misfortunes this month-every month for that matter, but what separates extraordinary salespeople from ordinary ones is that EXTRAordinary salespeople don’t allow adversities to have any permanence in their career. Ordinary salespeople hold onto unforeseen, uncontrollable circumstances-thus letting go of their goals and sinking their month, while extraordinary salespeople handle the adversities by learning how to manage the setbacks (flexible) while still moving forward toward their goal (inflexible).
Don’t adapt the goal to the path; adapt the path to the goal. 
I’ll see you next time on the Blacktop!
  

Most people fill a position, punch a clock, and collect a paycheck. Salespeople face the fear, find the opportunity, and earn a commission. I’m glad I ain’t like most….