Posts Tagged ‘autosuccess’

straight outta compton

Alan Wenkus, the screenwriter for the movie Straight Outta Compton (the story of N.W.A., the group that pioneered gangsta rap) was recently interviewed on a morning talk show and asked how much of the movie was real. Wenkus thought about it for a few seconds and said, “About 80% of it was real-it’s not that the other 20% was not, but it had to be colored in order to make the movie more cinematic.” He went on to say that, yes, the rappers’ lives-growing up in South Central L.A., having to face police brutality, gangs, and witnessing homicides on a daily basis was colorful enough, but certain emotional elements had to be put into the movie so that the audience could connect more with the characters of the movie. Essentially, Wenkus took actual facts, coupled it with emotion, and beget a blockbuster hit. “Before the movie my phone hardly rang-now I can’t keep up with the phone calls and producers are throwing money at me,” said Wenkus with a laugh.

When presenting your product, how cinematic are you? Your product presentation should be like that of Wenkus’ screenplay-factually written but comes alive with an element of flare. Customers buy cars, but they pay commissions based on how well you emotionally draw them into your product. They don’t need you to be a Wikapedia of cubic inches, torque, horsepower, and departure angles-no they need to know how your vehicle will improve their lives and the only way they’ll discover that your  vehicle is their best decision, is when you add an emotional element to make your script, i.e. your knowledge about your product, leap off the pages and into the mental screens of their lives. When they can imagine how they will look and feel driving their new vehicle, they’ll buy a ticket to your movie.
Great salespeople are great storytellers. Remember, your customer may have seen many shows, but they haven’t seen your show.  Take what you know and make it come emotionally alive with a hit show.
I’ll see you next time on the Blacktop. 

janitor

When my daughter MacKenzie says her prayers at night, I let her free flow-whoever and whatever she wants to pray for, I let her roll. One night as she was praying, she prayed for a name that I’d never heard before-his name was “Mr. Vic.” When I asked her who “Mr. Vic” was, she told me that he was the janitor at her school. “I’m praying for him, because he’s always nice to me,” she said. The other day Mack forgot her lunch, so I told her I would drop it off on my way to work. With only a few minutes to spare, I rushed into her school and placed her Lunchable on the table next to the lunchroom entrance alongside of a half dozen other kids who forgot their lunch too.  As I whirled around a man mopping the school’s floors, stopped swaying the mop from side to side and with a big, toothy grin, asked me how was I doing?  In a rush, I smiled back and told him I was doing fine and in turn, asked him how he was doing, but I didn’t have time nor the inclination to wait for his answer. As I waved goodbye to the ladies in the school’s front office it hit me, the man I had just spoken to in the hallway was Mr. Vic.

Turning around I walked back down the hallway and asked him, “Are you Mr. Vic?” he smiled and said that he was and as I shook his hand I said,  “Thank you for what you do, Mr. Vic.”  Stopping his mop, he pridefully looked around and said, “Oh, I’m just trying to keep it looking good around here.” “No,” I said, “Thank you for what you do while you’re here.”  I went on to tell him how my daughter prayed for him and that I appreciated how nice he was to her. “Sir, I’ve been here a long time, but I’m not here for the money-I’ve been offered opportunities to work at other places for way more money, but I don’t feel like that’s the position I’m supposed to be in. Maybe one day, but right now, I’m right where I’m supposed to be. My position is right here with these kids.”
Life is a blur and then we die. It becomes a blur because, we’re so focused on titles that we give no thought at all to our position in life. We’re so fixated on how the words printed below our name on our business card read; so hellbent on trying to schmooze with certain people, so adamant about rubbing elbows with a certain others, and are so seemingly obsessed with who we can step on, beat out, or crossover in our quest for a title, that we’ve lost sight of the most impactful part of our lives..our position.
If not today, one day you could find yourself wearing a title that you don’t care for-maybe you’re working for someone that you feel is inferior to your skills and expertise; perhaps you’re being asked to shoulder more responsibility with no more pay; or it’s conceivable that you find yourself standing in the ashes of a once promising career-for years you climbed the ladder of success-literally sacrificing everything, only to find yourself today back on the bottom rung having to start all over again.
Ground zero is where most people stall in life and ask, “Why?” Why was I passed over for this promotion? Why am I the one singled out to do more work while others stand around and get the credit? Why did injustice prevail and ruin my life? People who ask why park in life and become bitter; people who ask while move forward in life and become better.
The better question is to ask, “What do I do while I’m in this position?”
  • If you work for someone who you feel is inferior to your level of expertise and knowledge, your job is to make them look better. You have to understand this one position is not the end game in life unless you allow it to be. Use your vantage point to not only shore up their areas of weaknesses but also to gain a bird’s eye education into the pressures and decisions that they must make on a daily basis. If they’re poor at building relationships, you help build it for them; if they’re unorganized, you keep them on task; if they’re short sighted, you help them set the long-term vision. Stop competing for their title and begin completing their position. Not only will you earn her trust, but also you’ll build the morale of the  entire store. Remember, you’re teaching those who work under you how they should think and act. If you want it done to you, do it to others; if you want it done for you, do it for others.
  • If you keep getting volunteered for more work, shut up and do it. It’s been said that if you want something done, give it to a busy person. Don’t think like those who want to get the most for doing the least. Learning and teaching a new skill keeps you out of your comfort zone, raises your level of expertise, and makes you more valuable. Don’t wait for something catastrophic to occur to decide that you need to raise your game. Stay ready, don’t get ready.
  • If you find yourself back on the bottom rung in life…you’re not alone. We’ve all been there. I worked hard and lived fast until in 2008 I lost it all. I was financially, mentally, and spiritually bankrupt and had to start all over again. With my ego stripped, my position removed, and my hope lost I was scorched earth. But out of the ashes come new growth. It was at that time that I had to take responsibility for my life, put my feet back in the stirrups, and ride life’s horse again. I learned how to appreciate the good times and the bad; I realized that I could never be satisfied with what I already knew, and I had to lean on God to remind me that I still had more to give and much more to do. What you’re reading is my position..it is my testimony to let you know that you are not alone.
When you leave a room or leave this world what will be said about you? Obituaries are for titles-all the awards you amassed, all of the boards you sat on; all of the ribbon cutting ceremonies you attended will be printed on that piece of paper. But eulogies are for position. What will your eulogy be? What impact did you make for those you were around? Use your position to friend the porter who eats alone at lunch; use your position to encourage the accounting clerk who can barely pay rent and day care; use your position to develop the salesperson whose last resort is the car business.
Why’s not the question. While is. Use your position to go make an impact. They’re waiting on you…
Thank you, Mr. Vic.

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alone on deck

Showing up today matters.
It matters that you show up on time for work.
It matters-even if it’s 2 words or 2 sentences- that you find something worth writing down today that will help shape you into becoming better than you  were before you captured it.
It matters how quick and how many customers you are willing to get in front of today.
It matters that you are brave enough to pick up the phone and risk hearing a customer reject you instead of hiding behind a text message.
It matters that you ask your customer optimistic building questions instead of pessimistic, narrowing ones.
It matters that your customers demo the vehicle.
It matters that you write your customers up.
It matters that you persistently press forward beyond the 1rst, third, and 4th No.
It matters that you turn your customers over to let a fresh face help you.
It matters that you follow through after the sale-you not only need your clients to make your month, you need them to make your career.
It matters that you remain walking with your customers during the frustrating moments-the moments when the warranty they paid $2500 for won’t cover the repair.
It matters that you follow up and stay in touch with your customers’ lives not their wallets.
It matters that you help others regardless of what’s in it for you.
It matters that you’re willing to be a student of your profession.
You showing up today matters because everything you do (or don’t do) is significant to the outcome of your day, month, year, career, and your life.
(Yes, your life.)
What you do matters, but the emphasis of those matters have the wrong meaning.
When a customer hangs up on you…
When a customer won’t get out of the car and give you a chance to help them…
When a customer gets annoyed because you can’t tell them a price or tell them what their trade is worth in the first 30 seconds of meeting them….
When a customer won’t demo…
When a customer refuses to come inside “for your business card”…
When a customer  jumps across the street and buys from your competitor because you didn’t turn them over…
When a customer goes off on you because you dropped the ball while their car was in service…
When a customer won’t return your phone calls…
When a customer gets cold feet after agreeing to buy…
Failing matters, but it doesn’t give a meaning to what you are worth.
The ill moments-the moments when you screwed up, blew up, got yelled at, or were left standing alone should be tied to matters of the day not meanings of your heart.  What you do has to matter-showing up today, facing the giants in your life, has to be worth it…if it’s not worth it, don’t show up. Pivot and find something worth showing up for. What you do today has got to be so significant- so important to you, that the implications of what you do is higher than the outcome that it may produce. 
 
The outcomes only define how well you did something- they don’t define who you are or what you’re worth.  
 
Rejection is a lesson in self-education not self-worth. Use the losses, defeats, setbacks, and almosts as education not excuses. While circumstances are the banality of most, you forge ahead, working and reworking today’s defeats into tomorrow’s victories.  Sure rejection hurts- we don’t like the sting of hearing NO and the stains that it internally leaves behind;  we don’t like the fact that we poured out two hours of our best efforts only to have our customer go down the road to save a few hundred bucks. Rejection hurts, but you must not let it kill you.
Rejection has matter not meaning- the significance of what you do and how you do it matters. How much you’re willing to give to that matter is what has meaning.
I’ll see you next time on the Blacktop.

lonely-old-man1

It’s painful….

  • It’s painful to have the last 4 customers in a row tell you NO.
  • It’s painful to have a deal slip right through your fingers-they agreed to everything only to have a family member show up and queer the deal.
  • It’s painful to believe a customer is “coming right back” only to find their right back was not at your dealership.
  • It’s painful to hear that a customer that you spent 2 hours with yesterday bought elsewhere today.
  • It’s painful to stay late putting a deal together-to miss seeing your children before they go to sleep only to have the deal roll back in the morning.
  • It’s painful to have a customer drive off on you because you couldn’t tell him your “rock bottom price.”
  • It’s painful to have a customer come back, but not want to work with you.
  • It’s painful to see other salespeople selling cars all around you.
  • It’s painful to have second guessed catching that Up that turned into a deal.
  • It’s painful to have a customer hang up in your face.
  • It’s painful to not be able to lure a customer inside with the the “come on in and I’ll get you my business card” close.
  • It’s painful to hear your manager scorn that you’re not demo’ing, writing up, nor convincing enough customers to buy-punctuated up with, “You’d better figure this out real quick” threat.
  • It’s painful to not be able to even sell your best friend.
  • It’s painful to show a customer a note twice as much as what they’re paying now.
  •  It’s painful to hear people tell you that you’ll never make it in this business.
  • It’s painful to wake up in the morning-feet throbbing, back sore, and forehead blistered from standing in the sun all day every day.
  • It’s painful to hear your mind screaming that you’re not cut out for this, that you’ve lost your touch, that you should go to lunch and never come back.
  • It’s painful to have to start at zero every single month!
It’s painful…
I know…
But it’s not experiencing the pain that counts…
It’s not just you, we’ve all experienced these pains.
But it’s what you do with these painful experiences that matter.
They matter because you can either let the pain define why you can’t do, won’t be, and shouldn’t have…
Or you can allow the pain to refine your talents, shape your character, and form your destiny.
Success is painful…
It’s supposed to be-if it weren’t you’d never think; if you didn’t think then you’d never fight; if you never fought, you’d never learn; if you never learned, you’d never grow.
Experiencing pain is temporary-that’s called failure….
Avoiding pain is permanent-that’s called regret. 
Most people get to the end of life recollecting not of their failures…
They reminisce over their regrets.
Don’t ever get to the end saying, “I should’ve…”
Face the pain, saying, “I did.”
I’d rather try and fail than succeed at not trying.
I’ll see you next time on the Blacktop.
MB

One of the hardest techniques to teach a salesperson is that of the turn-over (T.O.). Boiled down to simplicity, the rules for a T.O. can be summed up in 9 words, “Before your customer leaves, introduce them to a manager.” That’s it!! How hard can that be, right? As it turns out, it’s very hard because we allow our feelings to hijack our disciplines. We walk customers for all kinds of reasons. (Walk is slang for letting a customer leave before introducing them to a manager) One reason we walk a customer is because we feel that we’ve made such a positive impression with a customer that we know they have no choice but to come back so instead of asking them to buy now, we sprinkle Be-back Dust on them and bid them farewell. Other times we walk customers when we are in our valley moments-these moments are when we are emotionally low; maybe we are having a bad day, week, or worse, we’re halfway through the month and we haven’t sold a single car yet-whatever the reason, we’ll bounce the, “I’m not buying today,” customer so that we can eagerly wait for the perfect lay down customer who will hopefully get our month back on track. And then there are those times we walk a customer simply because we just don’t like their attitude (I’m sure the feeling’s mutual). The list can go on and on why we won’t give a T.O., but when it comes to receiving a T.O., we’re all too willing.

See if this sounds familiar. A customer shows up on your lot, hurriedly picks out a vehicle and refuses to go on a test drive- reasoning that they just looked at one down the street “exactly” like it. Complying, you 86 the test-drive, hurriedly write up the trade, call to get a payoff, present numbers, …and they leave vowing to continue to keep shoping. Your business card just got added to the stack of other salespeople who thought the same way as you. If you only remember one thing today, remember this:

Never take a T.O. from a salesperson at another dealership.

Picking up where another salesperson left off is like you giving your competitor the PIN to your ATM card and allowing him to play with your money. When a customer shows up, they’re yours. What you do next determines whether or not they will remain that way. Ask any customer if they like to shop for a vehicle and you will hear a resounding, “NO!” Think about it, if customers hate shopping for a vehicle so much, then why do they continue to shop? Customers continue to shop because no salesperson has taken the time to meet much less exceed their expectations. A doctor doesn’t assume to know why you are sitting in their office. They ask a bunch of questions in order to gain a better understanding. Once they know why you are there, then they can diagnose how they will heal you.

Sure, your customers may come in weary and frustrated from shopping all day, but that doesn’t mean that you have to continue to add to the frustration simply because you’re the last dealership they visit and weren’t the first. They’re still shopping because every salesperson is taking an assumptive T.O. from the previous salesperson.

Your customer may have seen many shows today, but they haven’t seen your show. Be unique, creative, fun, and positive when determining why your customer is in the market, then you can discover how to select, demonstrate, write-up, and deliver based on those expectations.

It’s more profitable to give a T.O. than to receive one.

I’ll see you next time on the blacktop.

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image

Have you ever noticed when you only have 7 days left in the month, everything seems to matter? As sands of the hourglass mark the passing of the remaining 168 hours, it is at that point you miraculously can account for every one of your Ups, Demos, Write-ups, Sales, and Deliveries. First here, last gone; fewer lunches; no more huddles-nothing matters more than your working feverishly to cover your draw. Mentally exhausted; not knowing whether to giggle or cry from exasperation, you live to see another month, but now face the daunting task of having to start it all over again in 8 short hours.

As the dry-erase boards are wiped clean and the dawn of optimism breaks through the horizon of rejection, your new month begins now. It wasn’t by accident you pulled out your month, it was your focus; instead of glaring at the remaining 7 days of your month, alternatively choose to focus on the 7 days beginning your new month.

The greatest debt owed on the blacktop is your draw and the faster you can pay it back, the more control you will have over your month. With the beginning of a new month, many of us vow to work Bell to Bell, working from sunup to sundown in order to maintain an edge, but that edge is short-lived because you are not in “sales shape” to maintain that kind of pace-it’s like going jogging for the first time by entering the Boston Marathon. No matter your intentions, you cannot keep with the grueling pace and quit within the first mile-markers of your month. With your pride battered and beaten, you being your biggest critic, you settle into what you know best, working the 2:00 offense in order to pull out another month.

You cannot maintain a sprinter’s pace the entire month, so instead focus intensely on the first 7 days because doing so, will chart the course of the rest of your month. In the first 3 days, you need to be “on the board” with your first sale and by the 7th day, you need to have your draw covered. After that, the month is all yours- you are debt free! When you are released of an obligation, you can afford to take risks-every Up is not a Do or Die situation determining the outcome of your month. When you are released of an obligation, you now can focus on being more creative with your presentations-allowing your true personality to shine through, becoming other’s centered in lieu of being ME-focused.

An impoverished month begins with an indebted mindset. Seven days owed, 18 left to live freely.

I’ll see you next time on the blacktop.

You can say the message, yet convey the wrong meaning using poor body language. Actions speak louder than words- bring your words to life by body-building your way to a sale. Here’s how..