We always say, “Back in the days,” right? But it’s really never that way, saying it has a nice jingle to it, but it’s actually, “Back in the moments,” because as author Dan Milman says, “We don’t remember days, we remember the moments and it’s in those moments that determine the quality of our days.”
You have 2 of the toughest jobs ever-Sales & Life, which is why I call the podcast, The Sales Life,  because we’re all selling our way through Life. But when it comes to selling as a profession, we litterally walk out of our door every single day to fail. Because of the rejection, we’ve got to remember the moments-the moments when you were able to be a part of your customer buying their first vehicle; the moments they received a pay raise and wanted to treat themselves; the moments that they received a windfall of cash…or the moments they’ve had to start over-rebuilding not only their credit, but their lives as well.
Moments…
Moments that you shared with customers that you’ve known for decades-walking with them through various phases of their lives…
Moments when you the family embraced you as you came to pay your final respects…
See, the moments will push you through the days.
The days that you don’t know if you have the strength to go on.
The days when you struggle to get customer’s to say yes after hearing your landlord say no to letting you pay your rent a little late. The days where nothing seems to go your way- the day ending so bad that your car won’t even start so you can leave that night.
The days are tough…
So it’s important to remember the moments because it’s in those wonderful moments that determine the quality of your days. I like to say that the days are your experience and it’s through the experiences that cultivate your moments of wisdom. Moments determine the quality of your days.
I hope you have a good “moment” today.
Check out and subscribe to The Sales Life with Marsh Buice

What? not Why!

Posted: October 21, 2015 in Sales Success
Tags: , , , ,

  
The most important question you can ask yourself today is, “What can I learn from this?” As in life, most of your ideas you are selling today are going to get rejected by customers. When we get told No, we take it personally and begin to ask the wrong  questions.  With a defeated mindset, we ask questions such as, “What’s wrong with me?” “Have I lost my touch?” “Is my reign of good fortune over? (Maybe I need to move on)” These questions create chatter in your mind that begin to subtract from your self-confidence and personal growth. 

In no time you’ve kicked yourself down Losers Lane and have to begin a personal crusade to fight back to your ground zero.  Thus the cycle begins- we hack away until we get back to “normal,” then the tides turn- things don’t go our way- we lose our “hot hand,” we doubt, verbally beat ourselves up, feel defeated, and abort our efforts choosing to sit and sulk instead of standing back up and swinging.  Sound familiar? 

When the shift hits the fan and things don’t seem to be going your way- when the reigns of success try to turn cloudy and rain self-doubt and pity, catch yourself and ask, “What can I learn from this: split deal, customer bought elsewhere, deal couldn’t get bought or blew out of finance, or they came back but didn’t ask for me?” Find the lessons and make adjustments not excuses. That line of questioning will keep you in a growth, forward moving mindset. 

No retreat, no surrender- forever I’ll be selling. 
I’m proud of you!  
I’ll see you out there on the Blacktop. 

straight outta compton

Alan Wenkus, the screenwriter for the movie Straight Outta Compton (the story of N.W.A., the group that pioneered gangsta rap) was recently interviewed on a morning talk show and asked how much of the movie was real. Wenkus thought about it for a few seconds and said, “About 80% of it was real-it’s not that the other 20% was not, but it had to be colored in order to make the movie more cinematic.” He went on to say that, yes, the rappers’ lives-growing up in South Central L.A., having to face police brutality, gangs, and witnessing homicides on a daily basis was colorful enough, but certain emotional elements had to be put into the movie so that the audience could connect more with the characters of the movie. Essentially, Wenkus took actual facts, coupled it with emotion, and beget a blockbuster hit. “Before the movie my phone hardly rang-now I can’t keep up with the phone calls and producers are throwing money at me,” said Wenkus with a laugh.

When presenting your product, how cinematic are you? Your product presentation should be like that of Wenkus’ screenplay-factually written but comes alive with an element of flare. Customers buy cars, but they pay commissions based on how well you emotionally draw them into your product. They don’t need you to be a Wikapedia of cubic inches, torque, horsepower, and departure angles-no they need to know how your vehicle will improve their lives and the only way they’ll discover that your  vehicle is their best decision, is when you add an emotional element to make your script, i.e. your knowledge about your product, leap off the pages and into the mental screens of their lives. When they can imagine how they will look and feel driving their new vehicle, they’ll buy a ticket to your movie.
Great salespeople are great storytellers. Remember, your customer may have seen many shows, but they haven’t seen your show.  Take what you know and make it come emotionally alive with a hit show.
I’ll see you next time on the Blacktop. 

  
There are plenty of excuses why you shouldn’t…

All you need is 1 Reason Why you should wake, work, & make it worth it. 

  
Secret Shoppers grade salespeople based on: 

  • The professional manner in which they were greeted.
  • Did the salesperson take a genuine interest in their needs?
  • Was the customer offered to take the vehicle for a test drive?
  • Was the customer asked to purchase the vehicle?
  • Did the customer meet a member of management?
  • Was the customer contacted after the initial visit?

And when salespeople detect that they’re working with a Secret Shopper, they’re hellbent on acing all of the steps.

Makes you wonder, if we salespeople treated every customer as a Secret Shopper, how much more successful would we be? 

  
Someone can take away your home, car, job, money- even your children, but no one can take away your excuses. You’re the only one who can let go of excuses. Excuses justify why you’re where you are today and release you from an obligation to give more. Let go of the excuses of where you’ve been and where you are and take responsibility to where you’re heading. 

(HT Eric Greitnes’ awesome book Resilience) 

Video  —  Posted: July 3, 2015 in Sales Success
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

In sales, we’ve always been taught to “mirror” our customers, but what do you do when your customer is rude?